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Presentation
Effects of attentional demands and event structure on the psychophysical scaling of prospective and retrospective time judgements
New England Sequencing and Timing (NEST) 17th Annual Meeting (2007)
  • Scott W. Brown, University of Southern Maine
  • D. K. Rowden-Tibbetts, University of Southern Maine
Abstract
Subjects listened to four tape-recorded prose passages ranging in duration from 18 to 48 seconds, and then provided either prospective or retrospective verbal time estimates for each passage. The experimental design also included two levels of mental workload and two levels of event structure. The workload manipulation included a control condition involving no additional task requirements, and a detection condition in which subjects tried to detect certain target words in the passages. As for event structure, the passages were manipulated to produce a coherent version consisting of standard English prose, and an incoherent version in which the passages were syntactically correct but semantically meaningless. Analyses of power functions relating perceived time and physical time revealed that increased workload produced flatter slopes and larger y-intercepts for prospective judgments but had no effect on retrospective judgments. However, incoherent structure flattened slopes and increased y-intercepts for both types of time judgments. Target detection performance was worse under prospective (versus retrospective) and incoherent (versus coherent) conditions. These findings point to the importance of attentional processes in shaping time perception.
Keywords
  • time judgements
Publication Date
March, 2007
Citation Information
Scott W. Brown and D. K. Rowden-Tibbetts. "Effects of attentional demands and event structure on the psychophysical scaling of prospective and retrospective time judgements" New England Sequencing and Timing (NEST) 17th Annual Meeting (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/scott_brown_usm/37/