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Presentation
Migrant Students Scaffolding Their Stories: From Critiquing Socio-Culturally Relevant Mentor Texts to Publishing Collaborative Narratives
American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (2015)
  • Alma D. Stevenson, Georgia Southern University
  • Scott A. Beck, Georgia Southern University
Abstract
The children of migrant farm workers dropout of school more than any other group. Migrant children need and deserve substantial and well-focused support that is missing from most public schools. This paper presentation will describe research findings from an innovative summer literacy program for children of migrant farm workers. The program presented intermediate and middle-level students with over two dozen children’s picture storybooks (CPSBs), and systematically documented their responses to the books. Then, using these mentor texts and responses as scaffolding, the students collaborated to create their own, semi-autobiographical, illustrated, professionally-published narratives about growing up migrant. These student-created CPSBs challenge our society’s tragically pervasive narratives of erasure of and hatred toward migrants.
Keywords
  • Migrant sutdents,
  • Migrant farm workers,
  • Migrant children,
  • Children of migrant farm workers
Publication Date
April, 2015
Location
Chicago, IL
Citation Information
Alma D. Stevenson and Scott A. Beck. "Migrant Students Scaffolding their Stories: From Critiquing Socio-Culturally Relevant Mentor Texts to Publishing Collaborative Narratives" American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (2015)
source:http://tinyurl.com/lncmyat
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/scott-beck/1/