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Presentation
Improving Deaf Accessibility in Remote Usability Testing
13th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility
  • Jerry Schnepp, Bowling Green State University - Main Campus
  • Brent Shiver
Document Type
Presentation
Abstract

For studies involving Deaf participants in United States, remote usability testing has several potential advantages over face-to-face testing, including convenience, lower cost and the ability to recruit participants from diverse geographic regions. However, current technologies force Deaf participants to use English instead of their preferred language, which is American Sign Language (ASL). A new remote testing technology allows researchers to conduct studies exclusively in ASL at a lower cost than face-toface testing. The technology design facilitates open-ended questions and is reconfigurable for use in a variety of studies. Results from usability tests of the tool are encouraging and a fullscale study is underway to compare this approach to face-to-face testing.

Publisher's Statement
Presented at the 13th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, Dundee, Scotland, UK, October 24 - 26, 2011.
Publication Date
10-24-2011
Citation Information
Jerry Schnepp and Brent Shiver. "Improving Deaf Accessibility in Remote Usability Testing" 13th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/schnepp/18/