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Unpublished Paper
Export Credit Agencies and Climate Change: What Can They Do about It?
Intact Working Paper. Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik, Berlin. (2004)
  • Marcus Schaper, Reed College
Abstract

Among the chief contributors to the anthropogenic causes of global climate change are carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. Though the sources of these emissions are clearly identified, global carbon dioxide output from energy generation is still on the rise. Many industrialized countries have achieved a slow down in the increase of their emissions or even a reduction. However, emissions in developing countries are on the rise. A key challenge is to create incentives to turn around the trend of ever increasing emissions in the countries that are not obliged to reductions under the Kyoto protocol. Here, export credit agencies are often suggested as one possible instrument to promote low-carbon technology in the global south. However, it is not clear whether export credit agencies can deliver on this expectation and how they can best meet the challenge. This paper will discuss a number of suggestions for export credit agency policies that have been brought forth and will contrast them with critiques that consider export credit agencies to be an inadequate instrument to combat global climate change. As such, this paper cannot arrive at conclusive policy recommendations but it may serve as an aid in identifying areas for further research and professional exchange among the stakeholders involved.

Publication Date
January, 2004
Citation Information
Marcus Schaper. "Export Credit Agencies and Climate Change: What Can They Do about It?" Intact Working Paper. Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik, Berlin. (2004)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/schaper/2/