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Article
Effects of Subtle Heterosexism on Gays, Lesbians, and Bisexuals
Journal of Homosexuality
  • Shawn M. Burn, California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo
  • Kelly Kadlec, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Ryan Rexer
Publication Date
1-1-2005
Abstract

This study examined heterosexism that is not specifically targeted at LGB individuals, but may be experienced as antigay harassment, and may contribute to the stigma and stress they experience. LGB participants (N= 175, primarily Euro-American college students), read scenarios of heterosexuals saying or assuming things potentially offensive to gay men or lesbian women. For each scenario, they indicated the extent to which they would be offended and less open about their sexuality, and their perceptions of the behaviors as evidence of antigay prejudice. Not only did respondents find the scenarios to be offensive and indicative of prejudice, but perceived offensiveness was associated with a decreased likelihood of coming out. In comparison to gay men, lesbian women and bisexuals found the scenarios more offensive and more indicative of prejudice. Limitations of the current study and directions for future research are outlined.

Disciplines
Publisher statement
This is an electronic version of an article published in Journal of Homosexuality.
Citation Information
Shawn M. Burn, Kelly Kadlec and Ryan Rexer. "Effects of Subtle Heterosexism on Gays, Lesbians, and Bisexuals" Journal of Homosexuality Vol. 49 Iss. 2 (2005) p. 23 - 38
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sburn/11/