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Article
Development and psychometric evaluation of a quantitative measure of "fat talk".
Body Image
  • Sarah Murnen
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2010
Abstract
Based on her anthropological research, Nichter (2000) concluded that it is normative for many American girls to engage in body self-disparagement in the form of "fat talk." The purpose of the present two studies was to develop a quantitative measure of fat talk. A series of 17 scenarios were created in which "Naomi" is talking with a female friend(s) and there is an expression of fat talk. College women respondents rated the frequency with which they would behave in a similar way as the women in each scenario. A nine-item one-factor scale was determined through principal components analysis and its scores yielded evidence of internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability over a five-week time period, construct validity, discriminant validity, and incremental validity in that it predicted unique variance in body shame and eating disorder symptoms above and beyond other measures of self-objectification.
Citation Information
Clarke, P. M,* Murnen, S. K., & Smolak, L. (2010). Development and psychometric evaluation of a quantitative measure of ''fat talk.'' Body Image, 7, 1-7