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School connectedness, anger behaviors, and relationships of violent and nonviolent youth
Perspectives in Psychiatric Care (2004)
  • Sandra Thomas, University of Tennessee-Knoxville
  • H. Smith
Abstract

PROBLEM: Youth violence research often focuses on risk factors arising from early familial interactions rather than school-related factors. METHODS: Via an Internet questionnaire, 282 girls and boys (ages 7-19, mean 15.3) from 47 states and Washington, DC, reported on school connectedness, interpersonal relationships, and anger behaviors. FINDINGS: Substantial percentages of violent youth did not perceive themselves to be liked by classmates and reported loneliness. If not liked by classmates, 80% hated school. Likers and haters of school differed on seven variables (all p < or = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Insufficient attention is paid to the alienation experienced by disliked and lonely students. Mental health nurses could play a pivotal role in fostering change in the social climate of schools and helping youth to achieve better anger management and social skills.

Keywords
  • adolescent psychology,
  • nursing,
  • violence,
  • comparative study,
  • ethnological research
Publication Date
2004
Citation Information
Thomas, S.P., & Smith, H. (2004). School connectedness, anger behaviors, and relationships of violent and nonviolent youth. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 40, 135-148.