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Article
Consumer Preference Programs for Individuals Who are Homeless and Have Psychiatric Disabilities: A Drop-In Center and a Supported Housing Program
American Journal of Community Psychology (2003)
  • Sam Tsemberis
  • Linda Moran, New York University
  • Marybeth Shinn, New York University
  • Sara Asmussen, Pathways to Housing
  • David Shern
Abstract
We illustrate Fairweather's approach to Experimental Social Innovation and Dissemination with two experimental studies of programs to reduce homelessness for 168 and 225 people with mental illness and often substance abuse. Literally homeless participants were randomly assigned to programs that emphasized consumer choice or to the usual continuum of care, in which housing and services are contingent on sobriety and progress in treatment. A drop-in center that eliminated barriers to access to services was more successful than control programs in reducing homelessness, but after 24 months only 38% of participants had moved to community housing. A subsequent apartment program, in which individuals in the experimental condition moved to subsidized apartments directly from the street, with services under their control, had 79% in stable housing (compared to 27% in the control group) at the end of 6 months. Groups in this study did not differ on substance abuse or psychosocial outcomes.
Keywords
  • homelessness,
  • mental illness,
  • substance abuse,
  • consumer choice
Publication Date
2003
Citation Information
Sam Tsemberis, Linda Moran, Marybeth Shinn, Sara Asmussen, et al.. "Consumer Preference Programs for Individuals Who are Homeless and Have Psychiatric Disabilities: A Drop-In Center and a Supported Housing Program" American Journal of Community Psychology Vol. 32 Iss. 3/4 (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sam_tsemberis/15/