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Article
Social-Cognitive Predictors of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Reactivity to Interpersonal Conflict in Late Adolescent Couples
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships (2006)
  • Heidemarie K. Laurent
  • Sally I. Powers, University of Massachusetts - Amherst
Abstract
This study tested the extent to which the social-cognitive variables of sociotropy and negative relationship attributions predict physiological stress reactivity to interpersonal conflict among emerging adult romantic partners (N = 125 couples). It was hypothesized that sociotropy and negative relationship attributions would predict increased stress reactivity, indexed by salivary cortisol levels, both independently and inter-actively. Results supported the hypotheses but pointed to more complex and gender-specific relationships; sociotropy predicted higher cortisol during the conflict for men, but this effect was mitigated by causal attributions for negative partner behaviors. For women, causal attributions also tended to lower reactivity in the sense of faster recovery after the conflict event, while responsibility attributions predicted slower recovery and more extended physiological stress.
Disciplines
Publication Date
October, 2006
Publisher Statement
DOI: 10.1177/0265407506065991
Citation Information
Heidemarie K. Laurent and Sally I. Powers. "Social-Cognitive Predictors of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Reactivity to Interpersonal Conflict in Late Adolescent Couples" Journal of Social and Personal Relationships Vol. 23 Iss. 5 (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/sally_powers/5/