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Article
Why Do More Women than Men Want to Earn a Four-Year Degree?: Exploring the Effects of Gender, Social Origin and Social Capital on Educational Expectations
The Journal of Higher Education (2011)
  • Ryan S. Wells, University of Massachusetts - Amherst
  • Tricia A. Seifert
  • Ryan D. Padgett
  • Sueuk Park
  • Paul D. Umbach
Abstract

We test the assumption that peer and/or familial influences are partially responsible fore the expectation gender gap, and examine the differences in this gap by race/ethnicity. We find that the effects of social capital differ by gender but that the gender gap in expectations does not differ by race.

Disciplines
Publication Date
Winter 2011
Publisher Statement
Copyright 2011 by The Ohio State University Author(s): Ryan S. Wells, Tricia A. Seifert, Ryan D. Padgett, Sueuk Park, Paul D. Umbach Title: "Why Do More Women than Men Want to Earn a Four-Year Degree?: Exploring the Effects of Gender, Social Origin and Social Capital on Educational Expectations" DOI: 10.1353/jhe.2011.0004 Year published: 2011 Page numbers: 1-32 Publisher: The Ohio State University Press
Citation Information
Ryan S. Wells, Tricia A. Seifert, Ryan D. Padgett, Sueuk Park, et al.. "Why Do More Women than Men Want to Earn a Four-Year Degree?: Exploring the Effects of Gender, Social Origin and Social Capital on Educational Expectations" The Journal of Higher Education Vol. 82 Iss. 1 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ryan_wells/24/