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Article
Contextualizing Sexual Violence Committed During the War on Terror: A Historical Overview of International Accountability
University of San Francisco Law Review (2011)
  • K. Alexa Koenig, University of California, Berkeley
  • Ryan S. Lincoln, University of California, Berkeley
  • Lauren E. Groth, University of California, Berkeley
Abstract

This article examines the evolution of international norms pertaining to rape and sexual violence during armed conflict and political upheaval. It locates the recent perpetration of acts of rape and sexual violence committed during the War on Terror within this broader context and analyzes the challenges faced by domestic courts when, and if, they attempt to align their jurisprudence with international norms. The article gives specific attention to the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, and the International Criminal Court. Moreover, it explores the recent work by courts in Kenya and Uganda to develop a jurisprudential framework to facilitate prosecuting international crimes in the domestic context.

Keywords
  • International Criminal Law,
  • International Law,
  • Rape,
  • Sexual Violence,
  • War on Terror,
  • International Criminal Court,
  • International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda,
  • International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia,
  • Kenya,
  • Uganda,
  • Human Rights,
  • Women
Publication Date
Spring 2011
Citation Information
K. Alexa Koenig, Ryan S. Lincoln and Lauren E. Groth. "Contextualizing Sexual Violence Committed During the War on Terror: A Historical Overview of International Accountability" University of San Francisco Law Review Vol. 45 Iss. 4 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ryan_lincoln/3/