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Article
"Passing Through the Mirror": Dead Man, Legal Pluralism and the De-Territorialization of the West
Law, Culture and the Humanities. Volume 7, Number 2 (2011), p. 289-309.
  • Ruth Buchanan, Osgoode Hall Law School of York University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2011
Keywords
  • affect,
  • Deleuze,
  • imperialism,
  • law and film,
  • Legal Pluralism,
  • Western genre,
  • William Blake
Abstract
The failures of Western law in its encounter with indigenous legal orders have been well documented, but alternative modes of negotiating the encounter remain under-explored in legal scholarship. The present article addresses this lacuna. It proceeds from the premise that the journey towards a different conceptualization of law might be fruitfully re-routed through the affect-laden realm of embodied experience – the experience of watching the subversive anti-western film Dead Man. Section II explains and develops a Deleuzian approach to law and film which involves thinking about film as ‘‘event.’’ Section III considers Dead Man’s relation to the western genre and its implications for how we think about law’s founding on the frontier. Finally, the article explores the concept of ‘‘becoming’’ through a consideration of the relationship between the onscreen journey of the character Bill Blake and the radical worldview of his poetic namesake.
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Citation Information
Buchanan, Ruth. ""Passing Through the Mirror": Dead Man, Legal Pluralism and the De-Territorialization of the West." Law, Culture and the Humanities 7.2 (2011): 289-309.