Skip to main content
Article
Americas and Caribbean Islands Union
Western Hemisphere (2012)
  • Ruben B Botello, JD
Abstract
Americas and Caribbean Islands Union

By Ruben Barrera Botello, JD

Immigration is a major issue in the United States today. U.S. Latinos often express interest in this issue because of its direct impact on their families, schools, jobs, communities and governmental affairs.
Latinos are the largest minority group in the U.S. and in the following states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wyoming (see factfinder2.census.gov). Most Latinos in the U.S. are not immigrants, but most immigrants in the U.S. are from Latin America -- and especially from Mexico -- while most U.S. Latinos are of Mexican descent.
Latino immigrants bring their languages, cultures and traditions with them from their native lands, and this adds to the sense of kinship or affinity many U.S. Latinos have with new arrivals. This natural phenomena makes it difficult to separate the two distinct groups of Latinos in the U.S. -- immigrants and non-immigrants -- when discussing the immigration issue even though most U.S. Latinos are not immigrants.
Keywords
  • Americas,
  • Caribbean,
  • Immigration,
  • La Raza,
  • Latinos,
  • Native Americans,
  • Chicanos
Publication Date
2012
Publisher Statement
The Western Hemisphere needs an international political body that incorporates all the nations, states and territories of the Americas and Caribbean Islands.
Citation Information
Americas and Caribbean Islands Union By Ruben Barrera Botello, JD Immigration is a major issue in the United States today. U.S. Latinos often express interest in this issue because of its direct impact on their personal lives, families, schools, jobs, communities and governmental affairs. Latinos are the largest minority group in the U.S. and in the following states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wyoming (see factfinder2.census.gov). Most Latinos in the U.S. are not immigrants, but most immigrants in the U.S. are from Latin America -- and especially from Mexico -- while most U.S. Latinos are of Mexican descent. Latino immigrants bring their languages, cultures and traditions with them from their native lands, and this adds to the sense of kinship or affinity many U.S. Latinos have with Latino immigrants. This natural phenomena makes it difficult to separate the two distinct groups of Latinos in the U.S. -- immigrants and non-immigrants -- when discussing the immigration issue even though most U.S. Latinos are not immigrants.