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Article
Setting the Stage for Deception. Perspective Distortion in World War I Camouflage
Aisthesis (2016)
  • Roy R. Behrens
Abstract
Near the end of the 15th century, Leonardo da Vinci described a discovery he had made while investigating perspective. He mentioned it in his Treatise on Painting, and elsewhere included two drawings. He had discovered what is known as anamorphosis, of which his two examples may be the oldest surviving attempts. One is a drawing of a baby’s face, but laterally stretched and distorted, as if on a rubber sheet. The second, which represents a human eye, is also horizontally stretched (Baltrusaitis [1977]: 33; Leeman [1976]: 10-11). At the time he made these drawings, there was no way of predicting that, centuries later, this seemingly trivial finding, and its later applications, would be of substantial significance in World War I ship camouflage.
Publication Date
January 1, 2016
DOI
10.13128/Aisthesis-19414
Citation Information
Roy R. Behrens. "Setting the Stage for Deception. Perspective Distortion in World War I Camouflage" Aisthesis Vol. 9 Iss. 2 (2016) p. 31 - 42
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/roy-behrens/4/