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Article
The Role of Artists in Ship Camouflage during World War I
Leonardo
  • Roy R. Behrens, University of Northern Iowa
Document Type
Article
Keywords
  • Military camouflage,
  • World wars,
  • Ships,
  • Submarines,
  • Art photography,
  • Navies,
  • Design,
  • Artists models,
  • Merchant vessels,
  • Colors
Disciplines
Abstract
Experiments in ship camouflage during World War I were necessitated by the inordinate success of German submarines (called "U-boats") in destroying Allied ships. Because it is impossible to make a ship invisible at sea, Norman Wilkinson, Everett L. Warner and other artists devised methods of course distortion in which high-contrast, unrelated shapes were painted on a ship's surface, thereby confusing the periscope view of the submarine gunner.
Department
Department of Art
Comments

First published in Leonardo, v.32 n. 1 (1999), pp. 53-59, published by the MIT Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1162/002409499553000.

Original Publication Date
1-1-1999
DOI of published version
10.1162/002409499553000
Repository
UNI ScholarWorks, University of Northern Iowa, Rod Library
Date Digital
2006
Copyright
©1999 The MIT Press
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Roy R. Behrens. "The Role of Artists in Ship Camouflage during World War I" Leonardo Vol. 32 Iss. 1 (1999) p. 53 - 59
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/roy-behrens/15/