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Contribution to Book
Cyber Defense as Environmental Protection - The Broader Potential Impact of Failed Defensive Counter Cyber Operations
Conflict and Cooperation in Cyberspace: The Challenge to National Security (2013)
  • Jan Kallberg, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Rosemary A. Burk, Arkansas Tech University
Abstract
Key in the critique of the likelihood of cyber conflict has been the assumption that cyber does not lead to long-term and irrevocable effects – therefore it cannot be fought as a war. This might be true if cyber attacks are constrained to specific functions of a computer system or set of client computers, however, a failed cyberdefense can have wider effects than discussed in earlier debates of potential consequences and risks. The environmental aspect of cyberdefense has not drawn attention as a national security matter. We all, as people, react to threats to our living space and natural environment. Jeopardizing the environment, unintended or intended, have historically led to the immediate injection of fear and strong reactions in the population. Even unanticipated accidents with environmental impact have triggered strong moves in the public sentiment towards fear, panic, anger against government, and challenges to public authority.
Keywords
  • SCADA,
  • enviromental hazards,
  • cyberwar,
  • cyber attacks,
  • EPA,
  • FEMA,
  • damage
Publication Date
Summer July 31, 2013
Editor
Panayotis A Yannakogeorgos; Adam B Lowther
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Citation Information
Jan Kallberg and Rosemary A. Burk. "Cyber Defense as Environmental Protection - The Broader Potential Impact of Failed Defensive Counter Cyber Operations" PhiladelphiaConflict and Cooperation in Cyberspace: The Challenge to National Security (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/rosemary_burk/4/