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Article
An Investigation of the Neural Correlates of Attention and Effector Switching Using ERPs
Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Robert West, Iowa State University
  • Kira Bailey, Iowa State University
  • Moses M. Langley, Minnesota State University - Mankato
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
6-1-2009
Abstract
Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were used to examine the neural correlates of attention and effector switching when one or both types of switches were performed on a given trial. The response time data revealed that switch costs tended to increase from attention switches to effector switches to attention+effector switches. For right-hand responses, attention switching was associated with a parietal slow wave and effector switching was associated with a central readiness potential. For left-hand responses, attention switching was associated with a parietal slow wave, and effector switching was associated with a parietal slow wave and a readiness potential. These data suggest that the independence of the neural systems supporting attention and effector switching may be limited to instances where the dominant hemisphere controls the response.
Citation Information
West, R., Bailey, K.M., & Langley, M.M. (2009). An Investigation of the Neural Correlates of Attention and Effector Switching Using ERPs. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 9(2), 190-201.