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Article
The Influence of Race on End-of-Life Choices Following a Counselor-Based Palliative Consultation
American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Medicine
  • Kathleen Benton, St. Joseph’s/Candler Hospital System
  • James H. Stephens, Georgia Southern University
  • Robert Vogel, Georgia Southern University
  • Gerald R. Ledlow, Georgia Southern University
  • Richard Ackermann, Mercer University School of Medicine
  • Carol Babcock, Medical Center of Central Georgia
  • Georgia McCook, Georgia College and State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
10-1-2013
DOI
10.1177/1049909113506782
Abstract
Black Americans are more likely than whites to choose aggressive medical care at the end of life. We present a retrospective cohort study of 2843 patients who received a counselor-based palliative care consultation at a large US southeastern hospital. Before the palliative consultation, 72.8% of the patients had no restrictions in care, and only 4.6% had chosen care and comfort only (CCO). After the consult, these choices dramatically changed, with only 17.5% remaining full code and 43.3% choosing CCO. Both before and after palliative consultation, blacks chose more aggressive medical care than whites, but racial differences diminished after the counselor-based consultation. Both African American and white patients and families receiving a counselor-based palliative consultation in the hospital make profound changes in their preferences for life-sustaining treatments.
Citation Information
Kathleen Benton, James H. Stephens, Robert Vogel, Gerald R. Ledlow, et al.. "The Influence of Race on End-of-Life Choices Following a Counselor-Based Palliative Consultation" American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Medicine Vol. 32 Iss. 1 (2013) p. 84 - 89
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert_vogel/63/