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Unpublished Paper
Victims Without Legal Remedies: Why Kids Need Schools to Develop Comprehensive Anti-Bullying Policies
ExpressO (2008)
  • Robert S Salem, University of Toledo
Abstract

Bullying, or peer harassment, as it is often referred to, continues to confound educators, legislators, lawyers, public health advocates and others who are committed to quality education in an atmosphere free from violence and intimidation. This article helps to explain why solutions to this problem remain elusive and offers some practical suggestions to improve conditions for all schoolchildren. The authors highlight the inadequacies of existing legal remedies for victims of peer harassment and focus on methods to prevent bullying. In addition to broad recommendations, the authors make specific recommendations to counter three prevalent fact patterns in peer harassment that are inadequately addressed by courts and legislators, and therefore require extra attention from teachers, school staff and policy makers. These fact patterns are: (1) peer harassment based on actual or perceive sexual orientation or gender identity, (2) perpetual victims ---- students who are repeatedly subjected to harassment by a succession of first-time bullies, and (3) adult personnel who fail to intervene. The authors hope that this article will help scholars, lawyers and educators in their efforts to protect children from peer harassment.

Disciplines
Publication Date
June 3, 2008
Citation Information
Robert S Salem. "Victims Without Legal Remedies: Why Kids Need Schools to Develop Comprehensive Anti-Bullying Policies" ExpressO (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert_salem/2/