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Article
The Impact of Greek Affiliation on Students’ Educational Objectives: Longitudinal Change in Clark-Trow Educational Philosophies
Research in Higher Education
  • D.H. Wilder
  • H.F. McKeegan
  • Robert McKinley Midkiff, Jr., Bucknell University
  • R.C. Skelton
  • R.E. Dunkerly
Publication Date
1-1-1997
Volume
38
Issue
2
Disciplines
Abstract

Change in 4,119 students' freshman to senior ratings of four educational philosophies (vocational, academic, collegiate, and nonconformist) provided four measures of educational impact. Repeated measures analyses of variance compared changes in philosophy as a function of Greek affiliation, controlling for sex, historical era, major, parents' education, scholastic aptitude, and academic motivation. Small but significantly different degrees of change in the collegiate and nonconformist philosophies suggested that Greek affiliation increased social interests and inhibited some forms of intellectual interests. These small differences across all students masked the moderating effect of major. In the nonconformist philosophy, for example, the Greek × major interaction reflected substantial Greek–independent differences among humanities majors, and progressively smaller differences or reversals among social science, physical science, and engineering majors. Possible interpretations of this interaction are offered.

Citation Information
D.H. Wilder, H.F. McKeegan, Robert McKinley Midkiff, Jr., R.C. Skelton, et al.. "The Impact of Greek Affiliation on Students’ Educational Objectives: Longitudinal Change in Clark-Trow Educational Philosophies" Research in Higher Education (1997) p. 151 - 171
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert_midkiff/10/