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Article
The Effects of Community Pluralism on Press Coverage of Health Risks from Local Environmental Contamination
Risk Analysis
  • Robert J. Griffin, Marquette University
  • Sharon Dunwoody, University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Christine Gehrmann, Marquette University
Document Type
Article
Language
eng
Format of Original
10 p.
Publication Date
8-1-1995
Publisher
Wiley
Original Item ID
doi: 10.1111/j.1539-6924.1995.tb00337.x
Disciplines
Abstract
Based on the conflict/consensus model of Tichenor, Donohue and Olien, we proposed that mass mediated information signalling that local agents are contaminating the local environment and posing health risks is conflict-generating information and, therefore, will be controlled in the interest of community stability. We expected such control to vary by community structure. A content analysis of nine months of coverage by 19 newspapers supported the hypothesis that papers in more pluralistic communities were more likely than papers in less pluralistic communities to link contamination from local agents to threats to human health in the community and to frame such stories as problems. Newspapers in less pluralistic communities were more likely to frame local contamination in the context of solutions to the problem and were more likely to link contamination to health risks if the contamination were in a distant community.
Comments

Risk Analysis, Vol. 15, No. 4 (August 1995): 449–458. DOI.

Citation Information
Robert J. Griffin, Sharon Dunwoody and Christine Gehrmann. "The Effects of Community Pluralism on Press Coverage of Health Risks from Local Environmental Contamination" Risk Analysis (1995) ISSN: 0272-4332
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert_griffin/15/