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Article
Gender and age differences in chief complaints of acute myocardial infarction (Worcester Heart Attack Study)
Quantitative Health Sciences Publications and Presentations
  • Kerry A. Milner, Yale University
  • Viola Vaccarino, Emory University
  • Amy L. Arnold, Yale University
  • Marjorie Funk, Yale University
  • Robert J. Goldberg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
Date
3-5-2004
Document Type
Article
Medical Subject Headings
Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Angina Pectoris; Female; Humans; Male; Massachusetts; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Myocardial Infarction; Registries; Respiration Disorders; Retrospective Studies; Sex Factors
Abstract
We examined gender and age differences for chief symptom complaints in a population-based sample of 881 women (43%) and 1,192 men (57%) hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Women, in particular older women, were less likely than men to have a chief complaint of chest pain associated with AMI. Overall, a large proportion of women and men whose AMI was ultimately diagnosed did not present with chest pain as their chief complaint.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Am J Cardiol. 2004 Mar 1;93(5):606-8. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
Citation Information
Kerry A. Milner, Viola Vaccarino, Amy L. Arnold, Marjorie Funk, et al.. "Gender and age differences in chief complaints of acute myocardial infarction (Worcester Heart Attack Study)" Vol. 93 Iss. 5 (2004) ISSN: 0002-9149 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert_goldberg/44/