Skip to main content
Article
An Ethnographic Exploration of Self-Reported Violence Among Rural Methamphetamine Users
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
  • Rocky L. Sexton, Wright State University - Main Campus
  • Robert G. Carlson, Wright State University - Main Campus
  • Carl G. Leukefeld
  • Brenda M. Booth
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2009
Abstract
Baseline and follow-up qualitative interviews with methamphetamine users in rural Kentucky and Arkansas examined their involvement in drug-related violence. Twelve baseline participants reported methamphetamine-related violence, whereas 20 reported violence linked to other substances. In follow-up interviews conducted 12 to 24 months later, four participants reported methamphetamine-related violence and three reported violence associated with other substances. Violence was rarely directly attributed to methamphetamine's psychoactive effects. Rather, violence was associated with disputes over methamphetamine or its use, paranoia, ill-tempers, and hallucinations during methamphetamine “binges.” Implications of the findings for additional research and interventions are discussed.
DOI
10.1080/15332640802683409
Citation Information
Rocky L. Sexton, Robert G. Carlson, Carl G. Leukefeld and Brenda M. Booth. "An Ethnographic Exploration of Self-Reported Violence Among Rural Methamphetamine Users" Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse Vol. 8 Iss. 1 (2009) p. 35 - 53 ISSN: 15332640
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert_carlson/80/