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Article
Barriers and Pathways to Diffusion of Methamphetamine Use Among African Americans in the Rural South: Preliminary Ethnographic Findings
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
  • Rocky L. Sexton, Wright State University - Main Campus
  • Robert G. Carlson, Wright State University - Main Campus
  • Russel S. Falck, Wright State University - Main Campus
  • Carl G. Leukefeld
  • Brenda M. Booth
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2005
Abstract
There are no studies of African Americans’, methamphetamine use in the South where it is widespread among whites. We describe factors that inhibit or facilitate the diffusion of methamphetamine use among African Americans based on qualitative interviews with 86 drug users in rural Arkansas and Kentucky. Results suggest low prevalence of methamphetamine use among African Americans, and interviewees cited several barriers to its diffusion which were linked to the drug’s ingredients, psychoactive and physiological effects, difficulty in accessing distribution networks, and established African-American preference for cocaine. Fourteen African Americans reported methamphetamine use and discussed pathways to it. Possible increases in African-American methamphetamine use merits further investigation.
DOI
10.1300/J233v04n01_06
Citation Information
Rocky L. Sexton, Robert G. Carlson, Russel S. Falck, Carl G. Leukefeld, et al.. "Barriers and Pathways to Diffusion of Methamphetamine Use Among African Americans in the Rural South: Preliminary Ethnographic Findings" Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse Vol. 4 Iss. 1 (2005) p. 77 - 103 ISSN: 1533-2640
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert_carlson/175/