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Article
Scrutinizing a Survey-Based Measure of Science and Mathematics Teacher Knowledge: Relationship to Observations of Teaching Practice
Research in Science Education (2016)
  • Robert Talbot, School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado Denver
Abstract
There is a clear need for valid and reliable instrumentation that measures teacher knowledge. However, the process of investigating and making a case for instrument validity is not a simple undertaking; rather, it is a complex endeavor. This paper presents the empirical case of one aspect of such an instrument validation effort. The particular instrument under scrutiny was developed in order to determine the effect of a teacher education program on novice science and mathematics teachers’ strategic knowledge (SK). The relationship between novice science and mathematics teachers’ SK as measured by a survey and their SK as inferred from observations of practice using a widely used observation protocol is the subject of this paper. Moderate correlations between parts of the observation-based construct and the SK construct were observed. However, the main finding of this work is that the context in which the measurement is made (in situ observations vs. ex situ survey) is an essential factor in establishing the validity of the measurement itself.
Keywords
  • Teacher Knowledge,
  • survey measurement,
  • validity,
  • observation
Publication Date
Winter December 27, 2016
DOI
10.1007/s11165-016-9544-8
Citation Information
Robert Talbot. "Scrutinizing a Survey-Based Measure of Science and Mathematics Teacher Knowledge: Relationship to Observations of Teaching Practice" Research in Science Education (2016)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert-talbot/11/