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Article
The use of Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis in couple and family therapy research.
The Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples and Families (2016)
  • Robert Allan, School of Education and Human Development at the University of Colorado Denver
  • Virginia Eatough, University of London - Birckbeck College
Abstract
This article proposes a research methodology that is newer to the field of couple and family therapy (CFT) research called interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA). Researchers exploring CFT research continue to establish the efficacy of couple and family interventions in a context that favors a positivist view of phenomena. This research continues to be critical for establishing the role of CFT in the field of mental health as well as further clarifying which interventions are best for specific clinical issues and when. IPA offers researchers the opportunity to explore how couples and families make meaning of their experiences from an intersubjective perspective. Meaning making is central to understanding couples and families as well as part of the many clinical
approaches to working with couples and families. Despite the importance of meaning, few research methodologies allow for this central concept in CFT to be the focus of exploration. The following article outlines one such methodology and the possible use of IPA in CFT research.
Keywords
  • couple therapy research,
  • family therapy research,
  • interpretive phenomenological analysis,
  • phenomenology,
  • qualitative research
Publication Date
Fall September 21, 2016
DOI
10.1177/1066480716662652
Citation Information
Robert Allan and Virginia Eatough. "The use of Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis in couple and family therapy research." The Family Journal: Counseling and Therapy for Couples and Families Vol. 24 Iss. 4 (2016) p. 406 - 414
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/robert-allan/16/