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Contribution to Book
Getting Started with Portfolios: A Vision for Implementing Reflection to Enhance Student Learning
The learning portfolio: Reflective practice for improving student learning (2nd Ed.) (2009)
  • Stephanie Burrell, Fairfield University
  • Laurence Miners, Fairfield University
  • Kathryn Nantz, Fairfield University
  • Roben Torosyan, Fairfield University
Abstract
For full text go to: goo.gl/5NrMhD Excerpt: As Myles Horton described the essential task, “You only learn from the experience you learn from” (Newman, 2006, p. 240); but the question becomes how to guide learning from experience without inviting students to game the system by generating good confessions or conversion stories. One prompt that Roben created, for example, asks students in a core philosophy course to: Reflect on your own assumptions, strengths and areas to improve. Show, for example, how your own thinking changed or deepened, or how that was a struggle, and what you take away from the change or struggle to change. Avoid a “mandated confessional” (Brookfield, 1995, p. 13); examine honestly any tension or difference you felt with course goals or methods, for instance; just be sure to clarify what you learn from that. Criteria for evaluation include that a well-produced portfolio: o Avoids making several superficial reflections. Instead, develops a few, fully; expands and explains reflections by giving examples of what you take away from the change or struggle to change. Likewise avoids amassing lots of details; instead, selects a well-chosen few, and clarifies their point. o Avoids a static view of learning as perfect or final, by instead focusing on a learning edge where you are questioning assumptions. Perhaps the first criterion above would better read “Avoids making superficial reflections or else examines why you honestly struggled to do so,” and the second could read likewise, “where you are questioning assumptions or honestly struggling to do so.” Book description: The learning portfolio is a powerful complement to traditional measures of student achievement and a widely diverse method of recording intellectual growth. This second edition of this important book offers new samples of print and electronic learning portfolios. An academic understanding of and rationale for learning portfolios and practical information that can be customized. Offers a review of the value of reflective practice in student learning and how learning portfolios support assessment and collaboration. Includes revised sample assignment sheets, guidelines, criteria, evaluation rubrics, and other material for developing print and electronic portfolios. -- Publisher description.
Disciplines
Publication Date
January 1, 2009
Editor
Zubizarreta, John
Publisher
Jossey-Bass
Publisher Statement

Copyright 2009 Jossey-Bass.

Citation Information
Stephanie Burrell, Laurence Miners, Kathryn Nantz and Roben Torosyan. "Getting Started with Portfolios: A Vision for Implementing Reflection to Enhance Student Learning" San FranciscoThe learning portfolio: Reflective practice for improving student learning (2nd Ed.) (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/roben_torosyan/8/