Skip to main content
Article
Talking with Students Through Screencasting: Experimentations with Video Feedback to Improve Student Learning
Journal Of Interactive Technology And Pedagogy
  • Riki Thompson, University of Washington Tacoma
  • Meredith J. Lee, Leeward Community College
Publication Date
4-1-2012
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Changing digital technology has allowed instructors to capitalize on digital tools to provide audiovisual feedback. As universities move increasingly toward hybrid classrooms and online learning, consequently making investments in classroom management tools and communicative technologies, communication with students about their work is also transforming. Instructors in all fields are experimenting with a variety of tools to deliver information, present lectures, conference with students, and provide feedback on written and visual projects. Experimentation with screencasting technologies in traditional and online classes has yielded fresh approaches to engage students, improve the revision process, and harness the power of multimedia tools to enhance student learning (Davis and McGrail 2009, Liou and Peng 2009). Screencasts are digital recordings of the activity on one’s computer screen, accompanied by voiceover narration that can be used for any class where assignments are submitted in some sort of electronic format. We argue that screencast video feedback serves as a better vehicle for in-depth explanatory feedback that creates rapport and a sense of support for the writer than traditional written comments.
Version
Open Access Journal; policy not available in SHERPA/RoMEO
Citation Information
Riki Thompson and Meredith J. Lee. "Talking with Students Through Screencasting: Experimentations with Video Feedback to Improve Student Learning" Journal Of Interactive Technology And Pedagogy Vol. 1 Iss. 1 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/riki_thompson/3/