Skip to main content
Presentation
Low-level luminance mechanisms and the twostage perception of biological motion
Proceedings of Psychology bridging the Tasman: science, culture and practice: Joint Conference of the Australian Psychological Society and the New Zealand Psychological Society
  • V Smith, Southern Cross University
  • Rick van der Zwan, Southern Cross University
Document Type
Conference publication
Publication Date
1-1-2006
Abstract

The visual system has robust sensitivity to biological motion defined by point-light displays. However, specific aspects of the mechanisms involved in biological motion detection have yet to be explicated. This series of experiments was designed to determine the neural correlates of biological motion perception relative to the convergence of the ON- and OFF- visual pathways. In their study, van der Smagt and van der Grind (1999) suggested that local motion processing occurs prior to the convergence of the ON- and OFF-pathways. For the first time, the data reported here shows that at least some component of biological motion processing arises at that level, that is, in area V1. This study also provides evidence that supports the idea that there may be more than one stage of biological motion processing.

Disciplines
Citation Information

Smith, V & van der Zwan R 2006, 'Low-level luminance mechanisms and the twostage perception of biological motion', in M Katsikitis (ed.), Proceedings of Psychology bridging the Tasman: science, culture and practice: Joint Conference of the Australian Psychological Society and the New Zealand Psychological Society, Auckland, New Zealand, 26-30 September, Australian Psychological Society Ltd., Melbourne, Vic., pp. 380-384.

Abstracts of the Joint Conference of the Australian Psychological Society and the New Zealand Psychological Society published in Australian Journal of Psychology 2006, vol. 58, no. 1, supplement

Abstract available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00049530600940019