Skip to main content
Article
Would the Australian megafauna have become extinct if humans had never colonised the continent? Comments on 'A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australian megafauna and an alternative explanation' by S.Wroe and J.Field
Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)
  • Barry W Brook, Charles Darwin University
  • David A Burney, National Tropical Botanical Garden
  • Timothy F Flannery, South Australian Museum
  • Michael K Gagan, Australian National University
  • Richard Gillespie, Australian National University
  • Christopher N Johnson, James Cook University
  • Peter Kershaw, Monash University
  • John W Magee, Australian National University
  • Paul S Martin, University of Arizona
  • Gifford H Miller, University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Benny Peiser, Liverpool John Moores University
  • Richard G Roberts, University of Wollongong
RIS ID
22236
Publication Date
1-1-2007
Publication Details

Brook, B. W., Bowman, D. M J S., Burney, D. A., Flannery, T. F., Gagan, M., Gillespie, R., Johnson, C. N., Kershaw, P., Magee, J., Martin, P., Miller, G. H., Peiser, B. & Roberts, R. (2007). Would the Australian megafauna have become extinct if humans had never colonised the continent? Comments on ''A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australian megafauna and an alternative explanation'' by S.Wroe and J.Field. Quaternary Science Reviews, 26 (3-4), 560-564.

Abstract
The problem of the worldwide extinction of a diverse assemblage of Late Pleistocene and Holocene large-bodied animals continues to cause debate (Brook and Bowman, 2002; Barnosky et al., 2004; Burney and Flannery, 2005; Koch and Barnosky, 2006). The most recent contribution on the Australian megafaunal extinction (Wroe and Field, 2006), argues for a staggered series of extinctions over multiple glacial cycles, with most megafaunal extinctions predating the arrival of humans and driven primarily by climate change eventually causing a ‘hydrological threshold’ to be breached. At this point, accessible water became too scarce for megafauna to forage successfully. Although Wroe and Field (2006) highlight a range of ideas under consideration, they provide a selective interpretation which does not come to terms with biology and ignores or misinterprets current evidence.
Citation Information
Barry W Brook, David A Burney, Timothy F Flannery, Michael K Gagan, et al.. "Would the Australian megafauna have become extinct if humans had never colonised the continent? Comments on 'A review of the evidence for a human role in the extinction of Australian megafauna and an alternative explanation' by S.Wroe and J.Field" (2007) p. 560 - 564
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/richard_roberts/75/