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Course, Counselor, and Teacher Gaps: Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schools
(2015)
  • Rhonda Tsoi-A-Fatt Bryant
Abstract

More than half of all public school children live in low-income families. As the number of poor children has risen, so has the number of children who attend high-poverty schools. According to 2012 data, the most recent available, 1 in 5 children attend a school where at least 75 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunch—up from 12 percent just 12 years ago. Concentrated poverty is most prevalent in urban areas, where 34 percent of students attend high-poverty schools. Given the racial/ethnic makeup of our nation's urban centers, many of these students are children of color.Students in high-poverty schools lack the supports needed to become college ready, according to a report from CLASP. Course, Counselor, and Teacher Gaps: Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schools analyzes the nation's 100 largest school districts, focusing on "high-poverty schools" (where at least 75 percent of students live in poverty) and "low-poverty schools" (where 0 to 25 percent of students live in poverty). The report identifies major gaps in school resources and their impact on youth.

Publication Date
June, 2015
Citation Information
Rhonda Tsoi-A-Fatt Bryant. "Course, Counselor, and Teacher Gaps: Addressing the College Readiness Challenge in High-Poverty High Schools" (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/rhonda_tsoiafattbryant/27/