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Article
Differentiating ASD from DLD in Toddlers
Speech-Language Pathology Faculty Publications
  • Rhea Paul, Sacred Heart University
  • Katyrzyna Chawarska, Yale Child Study Center
  • Fred Volkmar, Yale Child Study Center
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
10-1-2008
Abstract
Failure to begin speaking, or acquiring words and word combinations, is the most common presenting problem in young children. For children with very limited communication skills, it can be difficult to differentiate between children suffering from autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and those with a more circumscribed delay in language development (DLD). This article reviews evidence derived from studies of toddlers who present with poor communication and social skills and summarizes characteristics of early development in these children to assist clinicians in differentiating between ASD and DLD in toddlers.
Comments

Published: Paul, R., K. Chawarska, and F. Volkmar. "Differentiating ASD from DLD in Toddlers." Perspectives on Language Learning and Education 15.3 (2008): 101-111.

PMID: 20852731

Citation Information
Paul, R., K. Chawarska, and F. Volkmar. "Differentiating ASD from DLD in Toddlers." Perspectives on Language Learning and Education 15.3 (2008): 101-111.