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Article
Regulatory federalism and broadband divergence: Understanding the implications of invoking Europe in the making of Canadian telecom policy
Intereconomics (2017)
  • Reza Rajabiun, Ryerson University
  • Catherine Middleton, Ryerson University
Abstract
Stakeholders in Canadian telecom policy debates increasingly point to the European experience with broadband infrastructure development, both as a cautionary tale and as an example to emulate. This article investigates the relevance to Canadian policy debates of competing conceptualizations of the European approach to the design of wholesale Internet access regulations and their application to next generation fibre access technologies. Despite a unified regulatory framework and EU-wide broadband speed targets, network performance measurements document growing divergence and clustering in the quality of Internet connectivity within Europe, indicating there is no single European approach that could be used to justify a particular regulatory course of action. Regulatory federalism and the differentiated outcomes it has produced in Europe do offer a rich body of evidence for policymakers searching for regulatory strategies that promote the pace of creative destruction in broadband network development, but policymakers should examine this evidence carefully to understand how particular outcomes have been achieved.
Keywords
  • Broadband,
  • policy,
  • strategy,
  • technological change,
  • Canada,
  • Europe
Publication Date
2017
Citation Information
Reza Rajabiun and Catherine Middleton. "Regulatory federalism and broadband divergence: Understanding the implications of invoking Europe in the making of Canadian telecom policy" Intereconomics Vol. 52 Iss. 4 (2017) p. 217 - 225
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/reza_rajabiun/17/