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Article
Peer rejection and social information-processing factors in the development of aggressive behavior problems in children
Child Development (2003)
  • Reid G. Fontaine, University of Arizona
  • Kenneth A. Dodge, Duke University
  • Jennifer E. Lansford, Duke University
  • Virginia Salzer Burks, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • John E. Bates, Indiana University
  • Gregory S. Pettit, Auburn University
  • Joseph M. Price, San Diego State University
Abstract
The relation between social rejection and growth in antisocial behavior was investigated. In Study 1,259 boys and girls (34% African American) were followed from Grades 1 to 3 (ages 6-8 years) to Grades 5 to 7 (ages 10-12 years). Early peer rejection predicted growth in aggression. In Study 2,585 boys and girls (16% African American) were followed from kindergarten to Grade 3 (ages 5-8 years), and findings were replicated. Furthermore, early aggression moderated the effect of rejection, such that rejection exacerbated antisocial development only among children initially disposed toward aggression. In Study 3, social information-processing patterns measured in Study 1 were found to mediate partially the effect of early rejection on later aggression. In Study 4, processing patterns measured in Study 2 replicated the mediation effect. Findings are integrated into a recursive model of antisocial development.
Keywords
  • Peer rejection,
  • Aggression,
  • Violence,
  • Children,
  • Adolescents,
  • Juveniles,
  • Social cognition,
  • Development
Publication Date
2003
Citation Information
Reid G. Fontaine, Kenneth A. Dodge, Jennifer E. Lansford, Virginia Salzer Burks, et al.. "Peer rejection and social information-processing factors in the development of aggressive behavior problems in children" Child Development Vol. 74 Iss. 2 (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/reid_fontaine/8/