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Article
A Long-Term Study of Sex Differences in Attitudes towards Women’s Roles in Society, in the Military, and in Combat
Journal of the North American Management Society
  • Regina A. Greenwood, Nova Southeastern University
  • Edward F. Murphy
  • Terrell Manyak
  • Bahaudin Mujtaba
Document Type
Article
Date
1-1-2008
Disciplines
Peer Reviewed
0
Description
This study explored changes in attitudes towards women’s roles in society, particularly the military, from 1993 to 2004 using the Spence, Helmreich and Stapp (1973) Attitudes towards Women scale. The researchers surveyed 500 respondents in 1993 and 2,560 between 2002 and 2004, finding that, while both women and men became more equalitarian, women became even more equalitarian. Although both men and women believe that women belong in the military, female respondents felt that women would be just as good as men in combat while men felt that women should not be in combat occupations. The study concludes that traditional stereotypes have changed, but some stereotypes continue to exist, and these stereotypes are still marginalizing the value of women in the military.
Citation Information
Regina A. Greenwood, Edward F. Murphy, Terrell Manyak and Bahaudin Mujtaba. "A Long-Term Study of Sex Differences in Attitudes towards Women’s Roles in Society, in the Military, and in Combat" Journal of the North American Management Society Vol. 2 Iss. 2 (2008) p. 3 - 15
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/regina-greenwood/12/