Skip to main content
Article
Legitimation conflicts: The politics of hazardous waste siting law.
Faculty Publications
  • Robert W. Lake
  • Rebecca A. Johns-Krishnaswami
SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Rebecca (Johns) Krishnaswami

Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1990
Date Issued
January 1990
Date Available
July 2014
Abstract
The meaning of law resides not in the statute but in its interpreter. The mode of interpretation used by a particular agency of the state in a particular instance varies from interpretation based on abstract principles to interpretation guided by local contingency. These modes of interpretation are associated with conflicting and mutually exclusive forms of state legitimation. Law and regulation as written, adjudicated, and implemented provide a text that can be read as an indicator of how, and in whose favor, the conflicting legitimation needs of different levels of government have been resolved in particular instances. We illustrate this conceptualization of law with regard to federal-state-local conflict over hazardous waste facility siting. The particular form that hazardous waste law takes in particular places represents the political resolution of conflict among different agencies of the state responding to competing sources of legitimation.
Comments
Abstract only. Full-text article is available only through licensed access provided by the publisher. Published in Urban Geography, 11(5), 488-508. DOI: 10.2747/0272-3638.11.5.488
Language
en_US
Publisher
Taylor & Francis, Inc.
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Citation Information
Lake, R.W. & Johns, R.A. (1990). Legitimation conflicts: The politics of hazardous waste siting law. Urban Geography, 11(5), 488-508. DOI: 10.2747/0272-3638.11.5.488