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Article
Accounting for Follow-up Bias in Estimation of HIV Incidence Rates
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society A (1997)
  • Ron Brookmeyer, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Abstract

The objective of this paper is to describe methods for estimating current incidence rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that account for follow-up bias. Follow-up bias arises when the incidence rate among individuals in a cohort who return for follow-up is different from the incidence rate among those who do not return. The methods are based on the use of early markers of HIV infection such as p24 antigen. The first method, called the cross-sectional method, uses only data collected at an initial base-line visit. The method does not require follow-up data but does require a priori knowledge of the mean duration of the marker. A confidence interval procedure is developed that accounts for uncertainty in the duration of the marker. The second method combines the base-line data from all individuals together with follow-up data from those individuals who return for follow-up. This method has the distinct advantage of not requiring prior information about the mean duration of the marker. Several confidence interval procedures for the incidence rate are compared by simulation. The methods are applied to a study in India to estimate current HIV incidence. These data suggest that the epidemic is growing rapidly in some subpopulations in India

Publication Date
January, 1997
Citation Information
Ron Brookmeyer. "Accounting for Follow-up Bias in Estimation of HIV Incidence Rates" Journal of the Royal Statistical Society A Vol. 160 Iss. 1 (1997)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/rbrookmeyer/22/