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Article
Skin-to-Skin Contact Diminishes Pain From Hepatitis B Vaccine Injection in Healthy Full-Term Neonates
Neonatal Network
  • Raouth R. Kostandy, Cleveland State University
  • Gene Anderson, Case Western Reserve University
  • Marion Good, Case Western Reserve University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
7-1-2013
Disciplines
Abstract

Purpose: This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that skin-to-skin contact (SSC) would reduce hepatitis B vaccine injection pain in full-term neonates. Design: Randomized controlled trial (RCT ). Sample: Thirty-six mother-;neonate dyads were randomly assigned to SSC or control groups. Main Outcomes: Cry time (CT ), behavioral state (BSt), and heart rate (HR ) were measured throughout the 16-minute protocol. HR and BSt were measured every 30 seconds; CT was recorded continuously. Results: SSC neonates cried less compared with controls (23 vs 32 seconds during injection; 16 vs 72 seconds during recovery), reached calmer BSts sooner (M = 2.8 vs M = 6.5 time points), and trended toward more rapid HR decrease. SSC as described was safe and effective and merits further testing.

DOI
10.1891/0730-0832.32.4.274
Citation Information
Raouth R. Kostandy, Gene Anderson and Marion Good. "Skin-to-Skin Contact Diminishes Pain From Hepatitis B Vaccine Injection in Healthy Full-Term Neonates" Neonatal Network Vol. 32 Iss. 4 (2013) p. 274 - 280
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/raouth-kostandy/4/