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Article
Work strain, job satisfaction, and intention to quit: The moderating effect of long-term orientation
International Journal of Stress Management
  • Randi L. Sims, Huizenga College of Business, Nova Southeastern University
  • Cynthia P. Ruppel, Nova Southeastern University
  • P. Zeidler
Document Type
Article
Date
1-1-2016
ISSN or ISBN
1072-5245
Disciplines
Peer Reviewed
1
Description

The purpose of this study is to investigate the moderate role of national culture on the relationship between work strain and employee attitudes. National culture describes the context in which work strain is experienced and employee attitudes and intentions are expressed. National culture also influences the perceptions of its members by creating cultural schemata for how experiences are viewed and interpreted. This study considers the attitudes of 347 entry-level employees working in manufacturing and call center companies in China, India, and the Philippines. Our findings indicate the national cultural dimension of long-term orientation moderates the relationships between work strain, job satisfaction, and intention to quit. Isolating national cultural differences related to long-term orientation may aid in the understanding of more subtle cultural variances which may be overlooked when samples from seemingly similar national cultures and geographic regions are grouped for analysis.

DOI
10.1037/a0039755
Citation Information
Randi L. Sims, Cynthia P. Ruppel and P. Zeidler. "Work strain, job satisfaction, and intention to quit: The moderating effect of long-term orientation" International Journal of Stress Management Vol. 23 Iss. 1 (2016) p. 23 - 43
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/randi-sims/3/