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Crowdsourced peer- versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages
University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications
  • Heather L. Coley, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Rajani S. Sadasivam, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jessica H. Williams, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Julie E. Volkman, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Yu-Mei Schoenberger, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Connie L. Kohler, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Heather J. Sobko, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Midge N. Ray, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Jeroan J. Allison, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Daniel E. Ford, Johns Hopkins University
  • Gregg H. Gilbert, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Thomas K. Houston, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
Publication Date
11-1-2013
Document Type
Article
Subjects
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Tailored, web-assisted interventions can reach many smokers. Content from other smokers (peers) through crowdsourcing could enhance relevance. PURPOSE: To evaluate whether peers can generate tailored messages encouraging other smokers to use a web-assisted tobacco intervention (Decide2Quit.org). METHODS: Phase 1: In 2009, smokers wrote messages in response to scenarios for peer advice. These smoker-to-smoker (S2S) messages were coded to identify themes. Phase 2: resulting S2S messages, and comparison expert messages, were then e-mailed to newly registered smokers. In 2012, subsequent Decide2Quit.org visits following S2S or expert-written e-mails were compared. RESULTS: Phase 1: a total of 39 smokers produced 2886 messages (message themes: attitudes and expectations, improvements in quality of life, seeking help, and behavioral strategies). For not-ready-to-quit scenarios, S2S messages focused more on expectations around a quit attempt and how quitting would change an individual's quality of life. In contrast, for ready-to-quit scenarios, S2S messages focused on behavioral strategies for quitting. Phase 2: In multivariable analysis, S2S messages were more likely to generate a return visit (OR=2.03, 95% CI=1.74, 2.35), compared to expert messages. A significant effect modification of this association was found, by time-from-registration and message codes (both interaction terms p CONCLUSIONS: S2S peer messages that increased longitudinal engagement in a web-assisted tobacco intervention were successfully collected and delivered. S2S messages expanded beyond the biomedical model to enhance relevance of messages. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00797628 (web-delivered provider intervention for tobacco control [QUIT-PRIMO]) and NCT01108432 (DPBRN Hygienists Internet Quality Improvement in Tobacco Cessation [HiQuit]).
Keywords
  • UMCCTS funding
Comments

Citation: Coley HL, Sadasivam RS, Williams JH, Volkman JE, Schoenberger YM, Kohler CL, Sobko H, Ray MN, Allison JJ, Ford DE, Gilbert GH, Houston TK; National Dental PBRN and QUITPRIMO Collaborative Group. Crowdsourced peer- versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages. Am J Prev Med. 2013 Nov;45(5):543-50. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2013.07.004. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources
Link to article in PubMed
PubMed ID
24139766
Citation Information
Heather L. Coley, Rajani S. Sadasivam, Jessica H. Williams, Julie E. Volkman, et al.. "Crowdsourced peer- versus expert-written smoking-cessation messages" Vol. 45 Iss. 5 (2013) ISSN: 1873-2607
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/rajani_sadasivam/26/