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Article
As with Ebola Outbreak, Social Determinants of Health Crucial in Recent Rural U.S. HIV Outbreak
Off the Charts (American Journal of Nursing)
  • Rachel Parrill, Cedarville University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
8-25-2015
Abstract
This past fall, with the world watching, a crisis unfolded in West Africa that challenged our understanding of sociocultural environments, epidemiology, and health. The spread of Ebola and the intercontinental transmission of the disease exposed weaknesses in our epidemiological defense system. It also drew attention to the powerful role that cultural beliefs and practices can have on disease transmission during outbreaks. In that same time frame, and with similar cultural etiologies, another infectious crisis played out much closer to home. The setting: the rural Midwest, in and around the small town of Austin, Indiana. The disease: HIV. The crisis: an unprecedented outbreak—one with incidence rates (up to 22 new cases a day at the height of the outbreak) estimated to be higher than those in many sub-Saharan African nations and transmission rates through injection drug use higher than in New York City. Contributing to this “perfect storm” were socioeconomic factors characteristic of many rural settings, including poverty, low education levels, limited access to health care, and few recreational or employment opportunities.
Keywords
  • HIV,
  • treatment,
  • nursing
Citation Information
Rachel Parrill. "As with Ebola Outbreak, Social Determinants of Health Crucial in Recent Rural U.S. HIV Outbreak" Off the Charts (American Journal of Nursing) (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/rachel_parrill/21/