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Unpublished Paper
Career-based influences on scientific recognition in the United States and Europe: Longitudinal evidence from curriculum vitae data
Working Paper, Georgia Tech Program in Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, Atlanta, GA, USA (2012)
  • Jan Youtie
  • Juan Rogers, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Thomas Heinze
  • Philip Shapira
  • Li Tang, Georgia Institute of Technology
Abstract
This paper examines how funding patterns, career pathways and collaboration networks influence scientific recognition. We analyze these institutional factors in the early and middle phases of academic careers through comparison of a group of researchers recognized as creative by their peers with a matched group of researchers. Measurement of scientific recognition is based on survey nominations and research prizes in two growing, laboratory-intensive research domains: nanotechnology and human genetics. Curriculum vitae data is used to compare researchers based in the United States and Europe. In the early career model for the United States, we find that scientific recognition is associated with broad academic education, fast completion of PhD, and a record of independent post-doctoral research, while in Europe these factors are much less prominent. The mid-career model suggests that both in the United States and Europe fast job promotion within academia is a strong predictor of future recognition. However, there is a clear divide across the Atlantic regarding other mid-career factors: work experience inside and outside academia, research leadership, external grant income, and prizes from professional associations are connected to scientific recognition in the United States, but are less influential in Europe.
Keywords
  • Scientific recognition,
  • creativity,
  • academic career,
  • curriculum vitae,
  • organization,
  • institutional context,
  • United States,
  • Europe
Publication Date
June, 2012
Citation Information
Jan Youtie, Juan Rogers, Thomas Heinze, Philip Shapira, et al.. "Career-based influences on scientific recognition in the United States and Europe: Longitudinal evidence from curriculum vitae data" Working Paper, Georgia Tech Program in Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, Atlanta, GA, USA (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/pshapira/49/