Skip to main content
Article
The Nature of Crime by School Resource Officers: Implications for SRO Programs
Sage Open Access
  • Philip M Stinson, Bowling Green State University - Main Campus
  • Adam M Watkins, Bowling Green State University - Main Campus
Document Type
Article
Abstract

School resource officers (SROs) have become a permanent presence in many K-12 schools throughout the country. As a result, an emerging body of research has focused on SROs, particularly on how SROs are viewed by students, teachers, and the general public. This exploratory and descriptive research employs a different focus by examining the nature of crimes for which SROs were arrested in recent years with information gathered from online news sources. The current findings are encouraging insofar as they reveal that SROs are rarely arrested for criminal misconduct. When SROs were arrested, however, they are most often arrested for a sex-related offense involving a female adolescent. These sex-related incidents generally occurred away from school property or during nonschool hours and rarely involved the use of physical force. The implications of these findings for SRO programs are discussed.

Publisher's Statement
This project was supported by Award No. 2011-IJ-CX-0024, awarded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Justice.
Publication Date
1-1-2013
Citation Information
Philip M Stinson and Adam M Watkins. "The Nature of Crime by School Resource Officers: Implications for SRO Programs" Sage Open Access (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/philip_stinson/21/