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Article
A Functionalist Perspective on Social Anxiety and Avoidant Personality Disorder
Development and Psychopathology
  • Peter J. LaFreniere, University of Maine - Main
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
11-1-2009
Disciplines
Abstract/ Summary

A developmental-evolutionary perspective is used to synthesize basic research from the neurosciences, ethology, genetics, and developmental psychology into a unified framework for understanding the nature and origins of social anxiety and avoidant personality disorder. Evidence is presented that social anxiety disorder (social phobia) and avoidant personality disorder may be alternate conceptualizations of the same disorder because they have virtually the same symptoms and genetic basis, and respond to the same pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions. A functionalist perspective on social anxiety is formulated to (a) explain the origins of normative states of anxiety, (b) outline developmental pathways in the transition from normative anxiety to social anxiety and avoidant personality disorders, and (c) account for the processes leading to gender-differentiated patterns of anxiety-related disorders after puberty.

Citation/Publisher Attribution
Lafreniere, P. (2009). A Functionalist Perspective on Social Anxiety and Avoidant Personality Disorder. Development and Psychopathology, 21, 1065-1082. Available on publisher's site at http://journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0954579409990046
Publisher Statement
Copyright 2009 Cambridge University Press
DOI
10.1017/S0954579409990046
Version
publisher's version of the published document
Citation Information
Peter J. LaFreniere. "A Functionalist Perspective on Social Anxiety and Avoidant Personality Disorder" Development and Psychopathology Vol. 21 Iss. Special Issue 4 (2009) p. 1065 - 1082
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/peter_lafreniere/1/