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Postexercise dietary protein strategies to maximize skeletal muscle repair and remodeling in masters endurance athletes: A review
International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism (2016)
  • Thomas M Doering, Central Queensland University
  • Peter Reaburn, Central Queensland University
  • Stuart M Phillips, McMaster University
  • David G Jenkins, The University of Queensland
Abstract
Participation rates of masters athletes in endurance events such as long-distance triathlon and running continue to increase. Given the physical and metabolic demands of endurance training, recovery practices influence the quality of successive training sessions and, consequently, adaptations to training. Research has suggested that, after muscle-damaging endurance exercise, masters athletes experience slower recovery rates in comparison with younger, similarly trained athletes. Given that these discrepancies in recovery rates are not observed after non–muscle-damaging exercise, it is suggested that masters athletes have impairments of the protein remodeling mechanisms within skeletal muscle. The importance of postexercise protein feeding for endurance athletes is increasingly being acknowledged, and its role in creating a positive net muscle protein balance postexercise is well known. The potential benefits of postexercise protein feeding include elevating muscle protein synthesis and satellite cell activity for muscle repair and remodeling, as well as facilitating muscle glycogen resynthesis. Despite extensive investigation into age-related anabolic resistance in sedentary aging populations, little is known about how anabolic resistance affects postexercise muscle protein synthesis and thus muscle remodeling in aging athletes. Despite evidence suggesting that physical training can attenuate but not eliminate age-related anabolic resistance, masters athletes are currently recommended to consume the same postexercise dietary protein dose (approximately 20 g or 0.25 g/kg/meal) as younger athletes. Given the slower recovery rates of masters athletes after muscle-damaging exercise, which may be due to impaired muscle remodeling mechanisms, masters athletes may benefit from higher doses of postexercise dietary protein, with particular attention directed to the leucine content of the postexercise bolus.
Keywords
  • aging,
  • muscle protein synthesis,
  • exercise recovery
Publication Date
2016
Publisher Statement
Citation only

Doering, T., Reaburn, P. R., Phillips, S. M., & Jenkins, D. G. (2016). Postexercise dietary protein strategies to maximize skeletal muscle repair and remodeling in masters endurance athletes: A review. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 26(2), 168-178.

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© 2016 Human Kinetics, Inc.

Citation Information
Thomas M Doering, Peter Reaburn, Stuart M Phillips and David G Jenkins. "Postexercise dietary protein strategies to maximize skeletal muscle repair and remodeling in masters endurance athletes: A review" International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism Vol. 26 Iss. 2 (2016) p. 168 - 178 ISSN: 1526-484X
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/peter-reaburn/11/