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Article
Can health status and self-esteem predict gratitude in adult females?
Current Research in Psychology
  • Peta Stapleton, Bond University
  • Jamaica Isles, Bond University
  • Hannah Chatwin, Bond University
  • Mahima Kalla, Monash University, Australia
Date of this Version
1-1-2016
Document Type
Journal Article
Publication Details

Citation

Stapleton, P. B., Isles, J., Chatwin, H., & Kalla, M. (2015). Can health status and self-esteem predict gratitude in adult females? Current Research in Psychology, 6(2), 31-45.

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© 2015 Peta Berenice Stapleton, Jamaica Isles, Hannah Chatwin and Mahima Kalla.

Distribution License
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0
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Abstract
Gratitude is often considered a sub-sector of positive psychology. The aim of this study was to examine whether health status and self-esteem could predict gratitude scores in a sample of women. A non-clinical female sample (N = 200) completed self-reported measures online. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to examine whether health status and self-esteem could significantly predict gratitude scores. Findings revealed that health status did not significantly predict gratitude scores in the sample of women in the current study. However, self-esteem was found to statistically predict gratitude scores, suggesting that women with low self-esteem levels were more likely to have lower gratitude scores, which is supported by previous research. The implications of this finding may benefit treatment programs, to increase self-esteem levels in individuals to achieve higher gratitude levels, resulting in various benefits for overall health and well-being.
Citation Information
Peta Stapleton, Jamaica Isles, Hannah Chatwin and Mahima Kalla. "Can health status and self-esteem predict gratitude in adult females?" Current Research in Psychology Vol. 6 Iss. 2 (2016) p. 31 - 45 ISSN: 1949-0178
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/peta_stapleton/79/