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Article
Anxiety, stress, and self-esteem across genders in a university sample: Exploring the role of body avoidance
Journal of Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences
  • Richelle M. Murphy, Bond University
  • Peta Stapleton, Bond University
Date of this Version
1-1-2015
Document Type
Journal Article
Publication Details

Citation only

Murphy, R.M., & Stapleton, P. (2015). Anxiety, stress, and self-esteem across genders in a university sample: Exploring the role of body avoidance. Journal of Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences, 24, 49-56.

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Copyright © 2015 JPBS

2015 HERDC submission

Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate whether university students’ body avoidance behaviors could be predicted by their level of self-esteem, anxiety, and stress, as well as their BMI and gender. University students (n = 86) completed a self-report package and results indicated that anxiety was the most important predictor of body avoidance for university students. Gender was also predictive of avoidance for university students. Post Hoc analyses indicated that body avoidance, anxiety, stress, and BMI, were higher for female university students, yet no difference was found for self-esteem between genders. These results suggest preliminary evidence for the importance of elevated body avoidance behaviors and anxiety among university students as well as the influence of gender on body avoidance and psychosocial variables among university students.
Citation Information
Richelle M. Murphy and Peta Stapleton. "Anxiety, stress, and self-esteem across genders in a university sample: Exploring the role of body avoidance" Journal of Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences Vol. 24 (2015) p. 49 - 56 ISSN: 1061-6799
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/peta_stapleton/71/