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Article
Perspectives of Awareness and Cognitive Processing During the Event of Stroke and Subsequent Recovery: Competence Versus Performance
Journal of Cognitive Rehabilitation
  • Pennie S. Seibert, Boise State University
  • Pernilla M. Stridh-Igo, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center
  • Tiffany A. Whitmore, St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center
  • Christian G. Zimmerman, St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2003
Abstract
We investigated strokes' effects on awareness and cognition from the participants' perspective in four case studies, ages 37-50 (mean = 45). Data is comprised of standardized and open-ended interviews, medical chart reviews, literature reviews, and professional consultations. Although the participants sustained various types of injuries, they reported similar patterns of awareness, perceptions, emotions, and thoughts. These case studies endorse the idea that stroke victims are far more aware of their surroundings than they appear. Their reports indicate active mental processes, such as emotion and thoughts, occurring even while their bodies were unable to respond appropriately. We discuss four areas of interest: awareness during stroke and recovery, state-dependent effects in experience and emotion, memory formation during stroke, and effects of communication deficits.
Citation Information
Pennie S. Seibert, Pernilla M. Stridh-Igo, Tiffany A. Whitmore and Christian G. Zimmerman. "Perspectives of Awareness and Cognitive Processing During the Event of Stroke and Subsequent Recovery: Competence Versus Performance" Journal of Cognitive Rehabilitation (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/pennie_seibert/30/