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Ice Patch Archaeology and Paleoecology in Glacier National Park
Archaeology Program, National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior (2014)
  • Pei-Lin Yu
Abstract

A fragment of basket. The tip of a digging stick. The shaft of an ancient spearthrower. Very rarely do such items preserve in the archeological record, but these works of ingenuity and craftsmanship, reflective of past human presence and lifeways in sub-alpine and alpine environments, have been preserved in nearly perfect condition in ice and snow patches for hundreds—or even thousands—of years. Also locked in the ice are traces of vanished ecosystems: animal scat, bones, horns, antlers, fragments of ancient wood, even entire “frozen forests.”

Publication Date
2014
Publisher Statement

This document was originally published by the National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior in Archaeology Program. Copyright restrictions may apply.

The following video was co-produced with Salish Kootenai College, Pablo MT:

Ice Patch Archeology in Glacier National Park
Citation Information
Pei-Lin Yu. "Ice Patch Archaeology and Paleoecology in Glacier National Park" Archaeology Program, National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/pei-lin_yu/19/