Skip to main content
Other
Birds of the Rocky Mountains with Particular Reference to National Parks in the Northern Rocky Mountain Region
Birds of the Rocky Mountains -- Paul A. Johnsgard
  • Paul A. Johnsgard, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Date of this Version
1-1-2009
Disciplines
Comments
Copyright © 1986 by Paul A. Johnsgard Electronic revised edition copyright © 2009 by Paul A. Johnsgard Electronic revised edition published by University of Nebraska– Lincoln Libraries in 2009
Abstract
Notwithstanding the great latitudinal spread and the equally wide altitudinal variations that occur in the region, the Rocky Mountains contain surprisingly uniform bird life. A bird-watcher in Banff or Jasper national parks in Alberta will encounter the vast majority of the same breeding species in the coniferous zones of those areas as one who is observing nearly a thousand miles to the south in Rocky Mountain National Park, although particular bird species would occur at considerably different altitudes. This comprehensive reference work describes in detail 354 species found in a 353,000-square-mile area—from the 40th parallel in Colorado north to the 52nd parallel in Canada; from the western border of Idaho to the eastern boundaries of Montana and Wyoming. Although not an identification guide per se, the species descriptions will aid in field identification for persons already somewhat familiar with bird groups. Of more importance, however, are the range maps and status charts that accompany each of the species listings. Here a visitor to any one of the major national parks in the Rocky Mountain region can have quick access to the abundance and seasonality of a given species. In addition, a comprehensive introduction describes the predominant life zones of the region, and over a dozen maps illustrate such significant features as precipitation patterns, vegetation community types, and major physiographic provinces. Illustrated with 42 color plates, hundreds of line drawings, and individual park maps, Birds of the Rocky Mountains will prove to be indispensable to amateur and seasoned birders alike. This electronic edition contains a new "Supplement" of approximately 12,000 words, updating the species accounts and the technical literature, including all those species that have undergone changes in their vernacular or Latin names, have had important changes in ranges, or have shown statistically significant population trends or conservation status warranting mention. The update also includes six additional species.
Citation Information
Paul A. Johnsgard. "Birds of the Rocky Mountains with Particular Reference to National Parks in the Northern Rocky Mountain Region" (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/paul_johnsgard/343/